Education Activities

  • Calculate the Age of Ancient Cosmic Explosions

    In this project you will study LCOGT observations of supernova remnants to measure how fast they are expanding and calculate how long ago the supernova explosion occurred.


  • Craters in the classroom

    After carrying out this activity, students will understand the effect the mass, velocity and angle of an impacting object has on the resulting crater, in terms of diameter, depth and ejecta rays, and relate this information to the craters on the surfaces of Earth and the Moon.

  • Create a Hubble Tuning Fork diagram

    In this activity you will create stunning colour images of galaxies and add them to the Tuning Fork template to recreate the famous Hubble image.

  • Create Stunning Colour Images of the Cosmos (Using GIMP)

    This guide will show you how to create beautiful colour images using free software that can be downloaded from the Internet.


  • Create Stunning Colour Images of the Cosmos (Using Photoshop)

    This article will tell you how to use Adobe Photoshop to make high quality color images with your astronomical data.

  • Create Stunning Colour Images of the Cosmos (Using Pixlr)

    This guide will show you how to create beautiful colour astronomical images, using a free web app called Pixlr. 

  • How Big is the Solar System?

    How long would it take to travel to the Moon? Could you travel to the edge of the Solar System and beyond? In this activity students learn about the size of the Solar System, beginning with the Earth and Moon and reaching out to encompass the entire Solar System.

  • Making Impact Craters

    The aim of this activity is to understand the effect the mass and velocity of an impacting object has on the resulting crater, in terms of diameter, depth and ejecta rays and relate this information to the craters on the surfaces of Earth and the Moon.

  • Measure the diameter of the Sun

    In this activity you will measure how fast the Sun moves to caclulate how big the Sun appears in the sky. All you need are some household items and about 20 minutes on a sunny day.

  • Measuring the Age of the Universe

    The discovery of the expanding Universe was one of the greatest revelations in astronomy. During this activity students will relive Hubble’s monumental discovery by using real supernova spectra to create a famous Hubble Diagram.


  • Observing Asteroids, NEOs and Comets

    This project involves observing asteroids that are known and ones which have uncertain orbits and are in need of confirmation.

  • Play Bingo with Charles Messier

    Play a game of bingo and learn about the many wonders of the cosmos!


  • Star in a Box

    Have you ever wondered what happens to the different stars in the night sky as they get older? This activity lets you explore the life-cycle of stars.

  • Star in a Box (Paper-based)

    Have you ever wondered what happens to stars as they get older? This activity lets you explore the lifecycle of stars. In this activity you will explore the evolution of stars with different masses.

  • The Cosmic Distance Ladder: Parallax

    Determining the position of a star or other object in space is an important concept in astronomy. During this activity you will learn how the distances to nearby stars can be measured using the parallax effect, and put this method into practise to determine the distance to nearby stars.