Press Release: Recent

Powerful Ancient Explosions Explain New Class of Supernovae

Astronomers affiliated with the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) have discovered two of the brightest and most distant supernovae ever recorded, 10 billion light-years away and a hundred times more luminous than a normal supernova. Their findings appear in the Dec.

LCOGT's unique capabilities help identify supernova progenitor

In June of this year, supernova iPTF13bvn, surprised astrophysicists by revealing  its parentage. To date, Type Ib supernovae have appeared to come from nowhere. Type Ib supernovae explosions appear in surveys, but a search back through the archived data has so far resulted in no evidence of a progenitor, likely because they are simply too faint.

Sinistro astronomy imager captures first light

Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT), with first lights at nine new 1-meter telescopes since April of 2012, achieved another critical milestone by capturing the first on-sky image with a production Sinistro camera. In development for over six years, the camera is arguably more important than the telescopes that will use them.

Todd Boroson Will Take Helm of Las Cumbres Observatory

Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) announced this week that Dr. Todd Boroson has accepted the role of Director effective August 1, 2013. Dr. Boroson will replace Wayne Rosing, Founder and President, and Tim Brown, Science Director.

First Light At SAAO For Third 1-Meter Node Of Global Telescope

The first truly global telescope came a significant step closer to completion this month with the installation and first light on three new 1-meter telescopes at the South Africa Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) near Sutherland, South Africa. A team of five Las Cumbres engineers, technicians, and a postdoc, convened at Sutherland for three weeks during late February and early March to achieve this feat.

Las Cumbres Observatory spectrographs acquire target robotically

Two identical FLOYDS spectrographs, installed in recent weeks at telescopes 6,000 miles apart, robotically acquired a supernovae target this week. Due to the level of precision required and the difficulty involved, few if any, other ground-based spectrographs have ever achieved this milestone.